Christopher James Constantine – B Eng (Civil) GradIEAustchris@designresolve.com

Archive for May, 2010
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Links

Professional Associations:
www.ewb.org.au – Engineers without Borders Australia
www.architectswithoutfrontiers.com.au – Architects without Frontiers Australia
www.engineersaustralia.org.au – Engineers Australia
www.apesma.asn.au – Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists and Managers, Australia
www.eng.monash.edu.au – Monash Engineering Faculty
www.architecture.com.au – Australian Institute of Architecture

Design Favourites:
www.constantinework.com – DPJ Constantine’s online portfolio
www.cardplace.co.uk – UK card manufacturer
www.mattblatt.com.au – Furniture
www.newedge-thebrewery.com – Design Firm

Item of the Month Archive

March 2010

What’s on the plate for IOTM in March? Well… Somewhat predictably I’m serving up the series of wash basins and sinks that form Nilo Gioacchini’s Grandangolo range eluded to in Feb’s post. The collection itself is, in contrast to the distinct lack of originality shown by myself,  provides a refreshing approach to product design that offers optimisation of space through control of line and volume.

Nilo Gioacchini studied the Institute of Artistic Industries (ISIA) in Florence, Italy. A native of Italy he has over 35 years professional experience and achieved international recognition for his work. I assume that the tagline of this particular product lost something in translation as the English reads “A sign as synthesis of geometrical continuity and expression of the creative gesture“. Apart from suggesting that whoever translated this should be given a creative gesture of another kind, I would also suggest that the product is deserving of a much more eloquent branding slogan (sorry for being mean but I promise I won’t get started on the photo of Nilo displayed in the biography section of his website, shown above).  I would describe the range as an angular modern interpretation of traditional ceramics that achieves elegance and beauty through economy of form (inhale deeply)…

Instead of saying “buy it” or “it’s a must have item” all I will say is this; everyday items can be just as inspiring and uplifting as any of those in galleries. They have the potential to be more influential and will undoubtedly reach more people, in there homes and places of work. The designers of such pieces bare the responsibility of reaching the masses and are truly artists of the people. If every designer could consider Vitruvius’ maxium from De architectura, that design should exhibit three qualities “firmitas, utilitas, venustas” — that is, it must be durable, useful, and beautiful, we would be well on the way to producing design icon such as Nilo’s.

March 2010

What’s on the plate for IOTM in March? Well… Somewhat predictably I’m serving up the series of wash basins and sinks that form Nilo Gioacchini’s Grandangolo range eluded to in Feb’s post. The collection itself is, in contrast to the distinct lack of originality shown by myself,  provides a refreshing approach to product design that offers optimisation of space through control of line and volume.

Nilo Gioacchini studied the Institute of Artistic Industries (ISIA) in Florence, Italy. A native of Italy he has over 35 years professional experience and achieved international recognition for his work. I assume that the tagline of this particular product lost something in translation as the English reads “A sign as synthesis of geometrical continuity and expression of the creative gesture“. Apart from suggesting that whoever translated this should be given a creative gesture of another kind, I would also suggest that the product is deserving of a much more eloquent branding slogan (sorry for being mean but I promise I won’t get started on the photo of Nilo displayed in the biography section of his website, shown above).  I would describe the range as an angular modern interpretation of traditional ceramics that achieves elegance and beauty through economy of form (inhale deeply)…

Instead of saying “buy it” or “it’s a must have item” all I will say is this; everyday items can be just as inspiring and uplifting as any of those in galleries. They have the potential to be more influential and will undoubtedly reach more people, in there homes and places of work. The designers of such pieces bare the responsibility of reaching the masses and are truly artists of the people. If every designer could consider Vitruvius’ maxium from De architectura, that design should exhibit three qualities “firmitas, utilitas, venustas” — that is, it must be durable, useful, and beautiful, we would be well on the way to producing design icon such as Nilo’s.

What’s on the plate for IOTM in March? Well… Somewhat predictably I’m serving up the series of wash basins and sinks that form Nilo Gioacchini’s Grandangolo range eluded to in Feb’s post. The collection itself is, in contrast to the distinct lack of originality shown by myself,  provides a refreshing approach to product design that offers optimisation of space through control of line and volume.

Nilo Gioacchini studied the Institute of Artistic Industries (ISIA) in Florence, Italy. A native of Italy he has over 35 years professional experience and achieved international recognition for his work. I assume that the tagline of this particular product lost something in translation as the English reads “A sign as synthesis of geometrical continuity and expression of the creative gesture“. Apart from suggesting that whoever translated this should be given a creative gesture of another kind, I would also suggest that the product is deserving of a much more eloquent branding slogan (sorry for being mean but I promise I won’t get started on the photo of Nilo displayed in the biography section of his website, shown above).  I would describe the range as an angular modern interpretation of traditional ceramics that achieves elegance and beauty through economy of form (inhale deeply)…

Instead of saying “buy it” or “it’s a must have item” all I will say is this; everyday items can be just as inspiring and uplifting as any of those in galleries. They have the potential to be more influential and will undoubtedly reach more people, in there homes and places of work. The designers of such pieces bare the responsibility of reaching the masses and are truly artists of the people. If every designer could consider Vitruvius’ maxium from De architectura, that design should exhibit three qualities “firmitas, utilitas, venustas” — that is, it must be durable, useful, and beautiful, the

What’s on the plate for IOTM in March? Well… Somewhat predictably I’m serving up the series of wash basins and sinks that form Nilo Gioacchini’s Grandangolo range eluded to in Feb’s post. The collection itself is, in contrast to the distinct lack of originality shown by myself,  provides a refreshing approach to product design that offers optimisation of space through control of line and volume.

Nilo Gioacchini studied the Institute of Artistic Industries (ISIA) in Florence, Italy. A native of Italy he has over 35 years professional experience and achieved international recognition for his work. I assume that the tagline of this particular product lost something in translation as the English reads “A sign as synthesis of geometrical continuity and expression of the creative gesture“. Apart from suggesting that whoever translated this should be given a creative gesture of another kind, I would also suggest that the product is deserving of a much more eloquent branding slogan (sorry for being mean but I promise I won’t get started on the photo of Nilo displayed in the biography section of his website, shown above).  I would describe the range as an angular modern interpretation of traditional ceramics that achieves elegance and beauty through economy of form (inhale deeply)…

Instead of saying “buy it” or “it’s a must have item” all I will say is this; everyday items can be just as inspiring and uplifting as any of those in galleries. They have the potential to be more influential and will undoubtedly reach more people, in there homes and places of work. The designers of such pieces bare the responsibility of reaching the masses and are truly artists of the people. If every designer could consider Vitruvius’ maxium from De architectura, that design should exhibit three qualities “firmitas, utilitas, venustas” — that is, it must be durable, useful, and beautiful.

2367050167_840e09686b

IOTM March

news_350_im1

Grandangolo Range (distributed by Hatria)

Foto 027

Nilo Gioacchini… and his friend

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices’.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and have left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and have left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices’.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and have left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and have left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and have left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and have left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

March

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and have left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

March

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March

March

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

leonardo_davinci_03_10alexandre_gustave_eiffel

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

leonardo_davinci_03_10alexandre_gustave_eiffel

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

leonardo_davinci_03_10

leonardo_davinci_03_10

big–ove-look-right_opt

big--ove-look-right_opt

alexandre_gustave_eiffel

alexandre_gustave_eiffel

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually.

March 2010

So March is upon us, and I am late with my second ever entry… Whoops. I will however blame the month of February for this problem as it is a silly month with only 28 days, clearly not enough days to complete an blog entry befitting such marvellous readers as yourselves (enough?). The topic for this month? ‘the decline in glamour associated with the engineering profession in it’s current state and its direct link to the loss of creativity associated with both education and industrial practices‘.

Once upon a time, little boys and girls dreamed of being not only doctors, firemen or astronauts but also Engineers (not strectching it too far here?). In the past there were inspiring figures such as Sir Ove Arup, Alexandre Gustave Effiel and Leonardo da Vinci who married design with function and efficiency with beauty. These practitioners were both innovative and creative with an understanding both the mechanics of solids but also the intangibles of philosophy. Engineers were the decision makers, the designers and the catalysts for free thought. Now, bureaucracy has constrained them and creativity has become the field of those with degrees based solely in design. Codes and standards make the majority of design decisions for the Engineer today and left those still faced with new problems, deferring to those with less technical expertise.

I became an Engineer based on the rationale that if I became and architect or industrial designer I would always have to defer to an engineer for final approval. I wanted freedom to express my ideas in a manner that would not be constrained by others and produce truly uncompromised design solutions. In making this statement I have to highlight that I have not, do not and will never suggest that design professionals are superfluous or even over valued. They are an essential part of the creative process but, as is the case with sound managerial practice, decisions cannot be made without technical expertise and this is what makes the engineer irreplaceable.

The current generation of Engineers and their educators must be daring. This generation need to be assertive and strong in their work, embracing creativity and responsibility. Only when this begins to happen again will the lustre of the profession be restored. It is the Engineer’s responsibility to take control of the project and to make it work, not just in a functional sense but also contextually. Good Engineers will see that strength is derived from cur


The Report
This project is aimed at surveying the state of the art modern construction methods used in pre-cast concrete systems to suit today’s low cost housing needs worldwide. The following review will provide a basis for design formulation.
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